The Thrill of Victory

Last year I was a finalist for the Cambria Eisteddfod competition. My twelve-year-old son accompanied me on the three hour drive to New Ulm the morning of the poetry reading. After a long wait for road construction crews to wave us on and a frustrating turn that led no where, we finally arrived at the winery where the event was held.  Jordan watched from the crowd as I stood on the wooden stage under the giant “Wisdom Oak” and read my poems. After my reading, I sat next to him to watch the other finalists perform. Jordan nudged my arm and whispered, “I think you got this one, Mom.” 

When I was named “Bard” and awarded the hand-carved oak chair, it was a triumphant moment—a memory I will cherish forever. A memory made even better because I shared it with my youngest son. It takes some work to win a contest. First, you have to put your butt in the chair and write the piece(s) perfect  for that venue. And sometimes you need to drive through a construction zone and maybe even lose your way. But when it’s over and you hold the prize in your hands, you’ll be glad you did.

P.S. There’s a photo of me and my oak chair under the “Wisdom Oak” on my bio page.  Congratulations to this year’s winner, Margaret Hasse.

3 Comments

  1. Wendy Johnson
    Jul 6, 2011

    This is so nice Angie, I am glad Jordan could share this with you. Wish I could have gone with you too. I am so proud of you & the writer ~ instructor you have become.
    Wendy

  2. Margaret Marty
    Jul 26, 2011

    Angie, thank you for sharing this. You don’t know how much I look up to you! You inspire me beyond words.

  3. Margaret Marty
    Jul 26, 2011

    Angie, thank you for sharing this. You dn’t know how much I look up to you! You inspire me beyond words.

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